The 2017 ICCAT Meeting In Review

A Review of Hits and Misses for Atlantic Ocean Tuna Fisheries

I came out of this year’s annual meeting of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT, the intergovernmental body that regulates tuna fisheries in the Atlantic Ocean) with a mixture of frustration and satisfaction. Going in, I expected that this could be



For Sustainable Fisheries, ICCAT Must Close Implementation Gaps in Tuna Conservation, FAD Management and Observer Coverage

A Preview of Priorities for Atlantic Ocean Tuna Fisheries

Last year, ISSF welcomed progress by the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) on many fronts: maintaining the total allowable catch (TAC) for yellowfin and albacore tuna; advancing the development of harvest strategies; adopting stronger FAD management measures; and endorsing e-monitoring standards



An Appeal for Eastern Pacific Tuna Fisheries

Improvements to tuna measures, including harvest control rules, and more progress on FAD science are a must at this year’s IATTC meeting

It was merely a few months ago that we attended the last in a series of extraordinary meetings of the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) — gatherings convened to address unfinished business from the 2016 Commission’s meeting. As we prepare for the 2017 IATTC meeting



ISSF Position Statement Calls for Better Management of Stocks and Monitoring Requirements in Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO)

Reducing catches of bigeye tuna and using non-entangling FADs to protect sharks are among the changes advocated for Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) fisheries by the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) in a position statement submitted for the 13th Regular Session Meeting of the



Improved Monitoring in the World’s Largest Tuna Fishing Ground

The whys and hows of testing EMS on longline tuna vessels in the WCPO

You can’t fix what you can’t track. That’s why monitoring is the backbone of developing sustainable tuna fisheries and, ultimately, healthy oceans. From catch composition and bycatch statistics to monitoring compliance of vessels with national or international management measures — observing, measuring, assessing and reporting



ICCAT Meeting 2015

Building the framework for the precautionary management approach

As the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) gets ready for their 24th Regular Meeting in St. Julian’s, Malta from November 10-17, ISSF is committed to helping the region continue progress on fisheries management. The strategy for doing so prioritizes, but is not limited to, urging further improvement in the collection of FAD data, expanding the use of human observers, electronic monitoring and reporting technologies, and advancing the development of Harvest Control Rules (HCRs) in order to increase sustainability in the region’s tuna fisheries.



Taking Fisheries Monitoring to the Next Level: Electronic Monitoring in Ghana

Through the use of modern technologies to better monitor fishing activity at sea, there can be many winners: existing observer program coverage can be complemented, data needed for both scientific and compliance purposes are collected, the Government of Ghana can improve monitoring and control and vessel owners can clearly observe what is happening aboard their boats.